Tag Archives: VIDEO GAMES

LAN GAMING IS IN DIRE TROUBLE

LAN gaming is downplayed too often for the success of games. It was vital to the success of Doom in the 1990s, and until recently it was how PC games were played in tournaments. Even on consoles, the original XBox’s allowing of LAN multiplayer made Halo a lasting franchise. Yet now developers that had previously included the option are ditching it in order to fight piracy; the result is a game that will be completely dead as far as multiplayer goes once a central server is removed.

I’ll start by blaming Starcraft 2, the Call of Duty franchise, the Battlefield franchise, and the numerous Defense of the Ancients clones. Both the Battlefield and Call of Duty franchises started requiring a dedicated, non-LAN server for games; the LAN club at my university had people that would play the game, but we would never have the full room involved. Call of Duty was already shunned (we were PC gaming elitists), but Battlefield, a game that was known for it’s large player battles, was never played officially once Bad Company 2 hit (although we played it a lot on our own time). We reverted back to playing UT2k4, TF2, and CS:Source instead. Old games do get old eventually though, and nothing could prepare LAN events for Starcraft 2 and Dota 2/League of Legends.

Starcraft was played often along with Warcraft 3. It was common for one person to even get a Diablo 2 speedrun going in the middle of a day-long LAN party. They were loved games, and when Starcraft 2 launched it nearly killed LAN events for one of the largest universities in the USA.

It’s worth mentioning that removing LAN capability was a great anti-piracy measure. It killed the need for anyone to pirate it in the first place. Piracy happened at a LAN party unofficially. No one was allowed to talk about it, but if you didn’t have a game you just needed to speak up; someone would get it to you and get it working.

Starcraft 2, and after it Diablo 3, proved that you could force players to be online always to play with eachother and not suffer sales. Any boycott, same with Call of Duty, Medal of Honor, and Battlefield, would be ignored once the hype train arrived. It not only didn’t involve LAN options, but it was one of the most competitive games to date. The original game is/was a national sport of South Korea. Starcraft 2 almost killed my LAN club in everything but name only, and this is university that hosted the CSL Grand Finals in 2012.

It wasn’t just the DRM that Starcraft 2 incorporated, but it was the very competitive nature that made it popular. LAN parties were now segregated between SC2 players and everyone else; rather than try something new, or attempt to get a free game like Savage working, one game would be played all day. People stopped showing up as SC2 player took officer positions, because what’s the point of going to a LAN if you could play at home? Dota 2 and LoL only exacerbated tensions further. LANs that used to include over 100 diverse players were now down to 20-30 at most.

One of the disgruntled members started holding private LANs with a vast array of classic games, but anti-piracy gave him a headache at least once very LAN party. Westwood has been the worst (defunct) company so far; Nox has problems with the latest GOG version, and Red Alert 2’s anti-virus has completely broken it. Westwood Online would be the other option, but with the company gone it’s a non-option. These games are hardly viable any more because of the anti-piracy measures, and no one wants to give money to the IP’s current owner for supporting similar measures.

Anti-piracy and DRM effectively killed the multiplayer aspect of these games. Nox eventually worked, but only because someone grabbed an older version of it.

LAN gaming needs to be brought back. Valve has done a good job of keeping it in CS:Go. Smaller companies like Tripwire have been great about including it their games; if you haven’t played on a hacked (over six players) Killing Floor server at a LAN party, I actually recommend it (you’ll probably die due to the lack of perks, but it’s a great amount of fun). A few of us still enjoy the larger releases, but without LAN play they’re severely lacking an aspect that made the previous games fun. Diablo 3 hasn’t been played once. A Use-Map-Settings creation from Starcraft: Brood War is preferred over it’s sequel. Red Orchestra or Battlefield 1942 is played over 3.

EA is already facing troubles for it’s measures against gamers. Blizzard and others can’t survive on good name only. It’s not just LAN gaming on the line in the end. It’s games surviving their decade, and the consumer being able to actually use their purchase. The latest Sim City release is the biggest example of the horrific troubles of anti-piracy DRM; if EA ever went the THQ/LucasArts/Atari route, it’s doubtful they’d pull a Relic and incorporate the game into Steam. Diablo 3 and Starcraft 2 set that precedent for EA. When the companies fall, their games will too. All because a person may pirate it at a LAN, and they might derive joy from the multiplayer without paying for it.

tl;dr: DRM and anti-piracy is bad and evil. LAN games are fun, and you should buy them even if you ignore my rant.

LAN GAMING IS IN DIRE TROUBLE

LAN gaming is downplayed too often for the success of games. It was vital to the success of Doom in the 1990s, and until recently it was how PC games were played in tournaments. Even on consoles, the original XBox’s allowing of LAN multiplayer made Halo a lasting franchise. Yet now developers that had previously included the option are ditching it in order to fight piracy; the result is a game that will be completely dead as far as multiplayer goes once a central server is removed.

I’ll start by blaming Starcraft 2, the Call of Duty franchise, the Battlefield franchise, and the numerous Defense of the Ancients clones. Both the Battlefield and Call of Duty franchises started requiring a dedicated, non-LAN server for games; the LAN club at my university had people that would play the game, but we would never have the full room involved. Call of Duty was already shunned (we were PC gaming elitists), but Battlefield, a game that was known for it’s large player battles, was never played officially once Bad Company 2 hit (although we played it a lot on our own time). We reverted back to playing UT2k4, TF2, and CS:Source instead. Old games do get old eventually though, and nothing could prepare LAN events for Starcraft 2 and Dota 2/League of Legends.

Starcraft was played often along with Warcraft 3. It was common for one person to even get a Diablo 2 speedrun going in the middle of a day-long LAN party. They were loved games, and when Starcraft 2 launched it nearly killed LAN events for one of the largest universities in the USA.

It’s worth mentioning that removing LAN capability was a great anti-piracy measure. It killed the need for anyone to pirate it in the first place. Piracy happened at a LAN party unofficially. No one was allowed to talk about it, but if you didn’t have a game you just needed to speak up; someone would get it to you and get it working.

Starcraft 2, and after it Diablo 3, proved that you could force players to be online always to play with eachother and not suffer sales. Any boycott, same with Call of Duty, Medal of Honor, and Battlefield, would be ignored once the hype train arrived. It not only didn’t involve LAN options, but it was one of the most competitive games to date. The original game is/was a national sport of South Korea. Starcraft 2 almost killed my LAN club in everything but name only, and this is university that hosted the CSL Grand Finals in 2012.

It wasn’t just the DRM that Starcraft 2 incorporated, but it was the very competitive nature that made it popular. LAN parties were now segregated between SC2 players and everyone else; rather than try something new, or attempt to get a free game like Savage working, one game would be played all day. People stopped showing up as SC2 player took officer positions, because what’s the point of going to a LAN if you could play at home? Dota 2 and LoL only exacerbated tensions further. LANs that used to include over 100 diverse players were now down to 20-30 at most.

One of the disgruntled members started holding private LANs with a vast array of classic games, but anti-piracy gave him a headache at least once very LAN party. Westwood has been the worst (defunct) company so far; Nox has problems with the latest GOG version, and Red Alert 2’s anti-virus has completely broken it. Westwood Online would be the other option, but with the company gone it’s a non-option. These games are hardly viable any more because of the anti-piracy measures, and no one wants to give money to the IP’s current owner for supporting similar measures.

Anti-piracy and DRM effectively killed the multiplayer aspect of these games. Nox eventually worked, but only because someone grabbed an older version of it.

LAN gaming needs to be brought back. Valve has done a good job of keeping it in CS:Go. Smaller companies like Tripwire have been great about including it their games; if you haven’t played on a hacked (over six players) Killing Floor server at a LAN party, I actually recommend it (you’ll probably die due to the lack of perks, but it’s a great amount of fun). A few of us still enjoy the larger releases, but without LAN play they’re severely lacking an aspect that made the previous games fun. Diablo 3 hasn’t been played once. A Use-Map-Settings creation from Starcraft: Brood War is preferred over it’s sequel. Red Orchestra or Battlefield 1942 is played over 3.

EA is already facing troubles for it’s measures against gamers. Blizzard and others can’t survive on good name only. It’s not just LAN gaming on the line in the end. It’s games surviving their decade, and the consumer being able to actually use their purchase. The latest Sim City release is the biggest example of the horrific troubles of anti-piracy DRM; if EA ever went the THQ/LucasArts/Atari route, it’s doubtful they’d pull a Relic and incorporate the game into Steam. Diablo 3 and Starcraft 2 set that precedent for EA. When the companies fall, their games will too. All because a person may pirate it at a LAN, and they might derive joy from the multiplayer without paying for it.

tl;dr: DRM and anti-piracy is bad and evil. LAN games are fun, and you should buy them even if you ignore my rant.

MY GAMER ID

A lot of people play games. Some do it for fun, some actually do it for work and some actually make games for a living. A lot of the time they all get squashed together under the “gamer” label, which for me was actually something I wanted to be acknowledged for. Granted I’m not the type to go around screaming “Gamer Pride,” I just try to be myself like Steve mentioned awhile back. The thing is though I didn’t grow up in a Western society where the idea of individuality was encouraged. It’s not that the people where I’m from were against it more like it was just considered an oddity, an alien concept if you will. Conformity was their comfortability and that made me quite uneasy and very misunderstood for the most part. Over there people generally did the same thing (of course with variation) and the only labels people had were either you were “in” or you were “out.” I remember the first time the topic of conformity was brought to my attention; if you’ve watched the movie 21 Jump Street then you’ll get what I’m talking about somewhat. I was a “one strapper” when it came to wearing my back pack and one my friends took notice of that. After a brief discussion on why “two strapping” is “cooler” and me defending my want of being comfortable and myself, she looked at me and said “individuality isn’t really that cool.”

Some may say that that was a good thing. More generality than specialty. As mentioned everyone did the same thing; hobby wise people were into watching anime, playing video games, listening to music or playing sports. But there are no “gamers” in my hometown but everyone I know loves playing videogames, hell if you owned a console you were actually considered “cool.” Well more like “that guy has money, I can play on his system for free.” I actually had a guy come to my house in the morning just to play DoTA the whole day just so he wouldn’t waste money at a cafe (I don’t put out that easy, he’d buy me lunch and dinner :P). Anyway, I didn’t want to be another sheep in the herd so I tried to identify myself with something close to me which was gaming. You could say I was a hipster back then, when people were listening to popular music on the radio I was listening to Ska on my mp3 player. I was really on my own when I wanted to talk about games because most of the people I talked with only played a certain game somewhat comparatively to western gamers and the general love of the Call of Duty games. I wasn’t a social outcast, I was generally out going, hell I was a cheerleader at one point in time.  I’m not trying to get dark or anything but I was alone in what some may consider a lifestyle I tried to indulge in. But that’s the weird thing, labeling myself as a “gamer” wasn’t a negative connotation, sure people found it weird that I tried to dissect the meaning behind Shadow of the Colossus or once used The Power Rangers’ Megazord as a metaphor for the Holy Trinity (I went to Catholic school), instead I was regarded as creative and unorthodox in a good way.

Usually this is the part where you’d hear about “what gaming has done for my life” and all that jazz but that’s not really the point of this little article. I mean sure gaming has influenced my college and career path by wanting to become a game designer, but that was actually a calculated choice more than it was a desire. Gaming is what it is; a culture, a hobby or whatever. Sure you can say it defines me but I spent most of my time trying to define it. I don’t need it in my life but I certainly want it to be. I hear it a lot of the times that being called a “gamer” is a certain “social crutch” which leads to a lot of problems.

Being a certain label isn’t a bad thing. It’s isn’t something that you need to call attention to either. Most of the time it just so happens it is a part of you who are and I believe there’s nothing wrong with that at all. Let it identify you but don’t let it define you. I’m Ted and that’s my Gamer ID.

CH-CHECK IT OUT: THE DRUNKEN MOOGLE

I find it refreshing that video games can inspire creativity. The results are as varied as video games themselves. There have been many works of art, clothing, video series, and even games which can be traced back to video games. However, as an occasional tippler, I was delightfully surprised when I came across Video Game inspired alcoholic beverages.

Enter the Drunken Moogle: A blog site which caters to gamers who would prefer to drink something more sophisticated than just a beer. Here, many drinks can be found along with the recipe and instructions on how to make it. Also featured on the site are gaming related drinking paraphernalia and great drinking games that can be played at gaming parties, such as Super Smashed Bros.

Here are some drinks that are on my To-Do list:

Quick Boomerang (Mega Man 2 Shot)

Anti Sora (Kingdom Hearts Cocktail)

Yoshi’s Eggnog

Note: NUReviews does not condone underage drinking. Please abide to the laws regarding alcohol consumption in your country, unless you’re in international waters, then do whatever you want. Also, winners don’t drink and drive, unless it’s in a video game.